Perceiving the World Through Altered Eyes: Understanding How PTSD Changes the Sufferer’s View from a Polyvagal Perspective

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Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex condition that not only affects the mind but also alters the way individuals view the world around them. By examining PTSD through the lens of the polyvagal theory, we can gain insights into the body’s autonomic nervous system responses to trauma, shedding light on the altered perception experienced by sufferers. In this blog post, we will delve into how PTSD changes the way individuals view the world, drawing from the principles of the polyvagal theory and its implications for healing and recovery.

  1. Understanding the Polyvagal Theory
  • Introducing the Polyvagal theory and its relevance to PTSD
  • Exploring the three states of the autonomic nervous system: ventral vagal, sympathetic, and dorsal vagal
  • How trauma disrupts the body’s autonomic balance
  1. The Impact of Trauma on Perception
  • Examining the altered perceptions experienced by individuals with PTSD
  • Hyperarousal and hypervigilance: A heightened sense of threat and danger
  • The disconnect between actual and perceived levels of safety
  1. Altered Social Engagement and Connection
  • The role of the ventral vagal system in social engagement
  • How trauma affects the ability to trust and connect with others
  • Repercussions for relationships and social interactions
  1. Perceptual Filters and Cognitive Processing
  • How trauma shapes the cognitive processing of information
  • Heightened reactivity and distorted perceptions of reality
  • The impact on memory, attention, and decision-making
  1. Healing and Recovery from a Polyvagal Perspective
  • The importance of creating a safe environment for trauma survivors
  • Techniques for regulating the autonomic nervous system and promoting safety
  • Integrating the principles of the polyvagal theory into therapeutic interventions
  1. Cultivating Resilience and Restoring Perception
  • Building self-awareness and self-regulation skills
  • Engaging in trauma-informed therapies to reframe perceptions
  • Rediscovering a sense of safety, connection, and trust in the world

Conclusion: Through the lens of the polyvagal theory, we can begin to grasp how PTSD alters the way individuals perceive the world. Understanding the impact of trauma on the autonomic nervous system provides valuable insights into the challenges faced by sufferers and paves the way for trauma-informed interventions that promote healing and recovery. By recognizing the altered perceptions of those with PTSD, we can foster empathy, support, and provide effective strategies for restoring a sense of safety, connection, and trust in the world.